Seven Stories Press

Works of Radical Imagination

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Ava, Mila, and Rosalyn all work at Murray’s Diner in Long Island. They are friends and coworkers struggling to hold their disordered lives together. While Ava privately grieves the loss of her husband in the first Iraq War, Mila struggles to dissuade her seventeen-year-old daughter from enlisting in the second. Rosalyn works as an escort by night until love and illness conspire to disrupt the tenuous balance she'd found and the past she'd kept at a safe distance. The promise of a new relationship with a coworker soon begins to restore Ava's faith in her own ability to feel, and Mila learns through wrenching loss that children must learn from their own mistakes. But ultimately it is love for one another and for their wayward families that sustains them through the pain and uncertainty of a world with no easy answers.

With tender, unadorned prose and a supremely human sympathy for the triumphs and defeats of everyday life, in this long-awaited second novel Beverly Gologorsky delivers a moving and incisive story about loss, friendship, and healing in the shadow of a seemingly endless war.

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“Gologorsky's second novel, like her first, examines the lives of working-class families impacted by war ... The author treats each singular story line with insight, compassion, and no sentimentality.”

“The hard realities associated with growth, change, love, and death affect all, but the repercussions seem especially gritty in this working-class setting. Gologorsky’s writing is clean and spare as she gives each character her or his own specific voice and presents an unflinching, caring view of the world, well worth our time to see.”

“Unflinching, piercing, Gologorsky looks straight into the face of class in this country, capturing the reverberations across generations of who really fights our wars, who really serves our coffee, who really gets up in the dark to wipe the diners' counter clean. This book is filled with an array of characters whose bravery is unsung, women who persevere with a dignity unseen by many, until Gologorsky pulls the curtain back and allows us in.”

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Beverly Gologorsky is the author of the acclaimed novel The Things We Do to Make It Home, which was named a New York Times Notable Book, a Los Angeles Times Best Fiction book, and a finalist for the Barnes and Noble Discover Great Writers Award, as well as the novels Stop Here ("unflinching, piercing," according to Elizabeth Strout), and Every Body Has a Story. Her work has appeared in many anthologies and magazines, including the New York Times, Newsweek, and the Nation. A former editor of two political journals, Viet-Report and Leviathan, Gologorsky has contributed to Feminists Who Changed America, Patriots: The Vietnam War Remembered From All Sides, and The Friend Who Got Away: Twenty Women's True-Life Tales of Friendships That Blew Up, Burned Out or Faded Away. She lives in New York and Maine.