Seven Stories Press

Works of Radical Imagination

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Translated by Sonia Soto

With an afterword by the author

An international bestseller and marvel of intense eroticism, The Ages of Lulu is the lurid and compelling story of the sexual awakening of Maria Luisa Ruiz-Poveda y Garcia de la Casa—affectionately known by her family as Lulu.

At just fifteen years old, Lulu, a "round, hungry little girl," finds that her erotic cravings are already powerfully established when she is seduced by a family friend, Pablo, twelve years her senior. This initial encounter incites the violent power play that drives an adult Lulu through a series of increasingly titillating sexual exploits. Always fascinated by the thin line separating decency and morality from perversion, Lulu gains the courage to explore the darker side of her carnal desires—but as her forays become increasingly desperate, the world of illicit and dangerous sex threatens to engulf her completely.

A groundbreaking novel of sexual exploration, The Ages of Lulu sparked international controversy and was an overnight sensation when it was first published in Spain fifteen years ago. It won the Sonrisa Vertical Prize for erotic fiction, and was made into a film starring Javier Bardem. It has sold over 1.5 million copies worldwide and is available in over 20 countries. The reissue includes a new prologue by the author.

Collected in  

Women in Translation
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“A powerful essay into the darker side of female sexuality.”

“Carnality, intimacy, shame, and curiosity have made a triumph of this book which almost gave me a heart attack when I read it. Disturbing from head to toe.”

“Grandes has artfully set up a provocative tension between prose that is matter-of-fact and a subject thats anything but, and it leads us into profound questions about the nature of sexuality and the morality of pleasure. Deeply disturbing.”

“Luridly Inventive.”

blog — August 02

Women in Translation: Announcing a Week-Long Sale and a New Bookseller Initiative

Back in June, after we announced a special offer for Pride Month, Eileen Dengler, executive director of the North Atlantic Independent Booksellers Association (NAIBA) reached out to me asking if we could find a way to include booksellers directly in these kinds of initiatives. I was intrigued, and excited. I reached out to our sales team at Penguin Random House, and right away they were excited too. The result, beginning today, is what we hope will be a monthly partnership in which Seven Stories creates special themed collections and PRH offers these titles to booksellers at a special 51% discount for the entire month. Within that span, Seven Stories will also feature these collections for one week at a time online, hopefully building awareness of these titles—beginning today with “Women in Translation” since it is Women in Translation month, and the other, beginning August 15, “For Human Rights, Against War,” featuring a number of our most widely read political titles. We’ll discount these titles online, but only in such a way that booksellers can experiment with matching our discount if they so wish, thanks to the additional trade discount they receive.

We don’t know if this is exactly the right model. What we know is that a lot about it feels right, and we’ll keep experimenting until we find the model that is right for booksellers and publishers alike. If we can do that, then others will follow us.

If you have a local independent bookstore, shop there before you shop on our site, and remember that we provide a free e-book of every book that you buy from us online. If you buy one of the books from the collection at an independent bookstore, email a picture of your receipt to sevenstories@sevenstories.com to get a free e-book and updates from Seven Stories.

—Dan Simon, Publisher
Seven Stories Press

Here are the seven award-winning titles from our Women in Translation series, all at 35% off through August 8th. Free shipping within the U.S.!

1. The Hotel Tito: A Novel, by Ivana Bodrožić, translated by Ellen-Elias Bursać

Applauded as the finest work of fiction to appear about the Yugoslav Wars, acclaimed poet and novelist Ivana Bodrožić’s The Hotel Tito is at its heart a story of a young girl’s coming of age, a reminder that even during times of war—especially during such times—the future rests with those who are the innocent victims and peaceful survivors.

2. The Tongue’s Blood Does Not Run Dry: Algerian Stories, by Assia Djebar, translated by Tegan Raleigh

In these short stories, Djebar presents a brutal yet delicate exposition of how warring worlds enact their battles upon women’s lives and bodies.

3. The Ages of Lulu: A Novel, by Almudena Grandes, translated by Sonia Soto

The lurid and compelling story of the sexual awakening of a girl long fascinated by the thin line separating decency and morality from perversion, but whose increasingly dangerous sexual forays threaten to engulf her completely.

4. Syrian Dust: Reporting from the Heart of the War, by Francesca Borri, translated by Anne Milano Appel

In moving, powerful prose, Syrian Dust is a record of a freelance war reporter confronting the many-factioned conflict being fought against Bashar al Assad.

5. The Years, by Annie Ernaux, translated by Alison L. Strayer

The Years is a personal narrative of the period 1941 to 2006 told through the lens of memory, impressions of past and present—even projections into the future—photos, books, songs, radio, television and decades of advertising, headlines, contrasted with intimate conflicts and writing notes from six decades.

6. Natural Histories, by Guadalupe Nettel, translated by J.T. Lichtenstein

Five dark and delicately written stories by international award-winner Guadalupe Nettel unfold in fragile worlds, where Siamese fighting fish, cockroaches, a cat, a snake, and a strange fungus are mirrors that reflect the unconfessable aspects of human nature we keep hidden.

7. The Little Communist Who Never Smiled, by Lola Lafon, translated by Nick Caistor

Adored by young girls in the west and appropriated as a political emblem by the Ceausescu regime, Comaneci’s life was scrutinized wherever she went, her body seemingly no longer her own. Lafon’s ficitionalized account shows how an extraordinary athlete mesmerizes the world, her fate reverberating across nations.

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At the age of twenty-nine Almudena Grandes won the Premio La Sonrisa Vertical for Las edades de Lulú (The Ages of Lulu) in 1989. The cinematic adaptation, starring Javier Bardem, was released the following year. Grandes is now one of Spain’s best-selling authors, and her work has been translated into more than twenty languages. A regular commentator, Grandes has written for such publications as the Guardian, El País, and the New Yorker. She lives in Madrid.